Fabric Catalogue

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Abaca

Abaca, also known as Manila Hemp, is a natural fibre originating from the Philippines. Derived from the banana family, it boasts sturdy plant stems, making it a resilient and hard fibre with a wide range of applications.

Key Uses:

Abaca finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Rugs
  • Bags
  • Hats
  • Canvas
  • Ropes
  • Hammocks

Advantages

  • Durable
  • Strength
  • Flexibility
  • Resistance to Salt Water Damage

Disadvantages

  • Shrinks in Water

Acetate

Acetate, originating in the early 20th century, is a synthetic fibre that stands among the initial manufactured fibres. Formulated by utilising cellulose derived from wood pulp or cotton linters, acetate has garnered widespread acclaim, particularly for its distinctive features and versatile applications.

Key Uses:

Acetate finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Drapery
  • Lingerie
  • Hats
  • Outerwear
  • Mittens
  • Scarves

Advantages

  • Hydrophilic
  • Soft
  • Little Shrinkage
  • No Static
  • Breathable

Disadvantages

  • Dry Clean or Hand Wash Only
  • Poor Abrasion Resistance
  • Poor Heat Retention

Acrylic

Acrylic, a revolutionary synthetic fibre that emerged in the 1940s, has since become a staple in the textile industry. Crafted from shorter staples akin to wool and transformed into yarn, it stands as an exceptional alternative to Cashmere, offering a comparable luxurious feel. This versatile fibre can be tailored to imitate the textures of both wool and cotton, catering to diverse preferences.

Key Uses:

Acrylic finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Upholstery
  • Tracksuits
  • Hats
  • Faux Fur
  • Carpets
  • Sweaters

Advantages

  • Thermal Retentive
  • Stronger than Wool
  • Machine Washable
  • Hydrophobic
  • Resilient

Disadvantages

  • Carries Static
  • Low Absorbency
  • Heat Sensitive

Agneline

Agneline, a distinctive black woolen fabric, captures attention with its very long nape, offering a coarse and heavy texture. This fabric stands out due to its intriguing properties that contribute to its specific uses and distinctive qualities.

Key Uses:

Agneline finds its application in various areas, with notable uses including:

  • Trims
  • Collars
  • Evening Coats

Advantages

  • Water-Resistant
  • Resilient

Disadvantages

  • Coarse
  • Heavy

Albert Cloth

Albert Cloth, named in honour of Prince Albert, stands as a distinguished fabric crafted from wool. This double-sided textile, often adorned with patterns on each face, radiates regality and is primarily tailored for outerwear, notably double-breasted overcoats. Its rich history and association with royal nomenclature add a touch of sophistication to this exceptional fabric.

Key Uses:

Agneline finds its application in various areas, with notable uses including:

  • Outerwear
  • Overcoats

Advantages

  • Durability
  • Elegance & Sophistication
  • Double-Sided Design

Disadvantages

  • Limited Versatility
  • Specialised Care
  • Weight

Bamboo

With advanced treatments, bamboo fabric has become more versatile. It was originally used in corsets and is now used for a variety of purposes. The fiber is made from bamboo cellulose and has a variety of uses.

Key Uses:

Bamboo finds its application in various industries, including:

  • T-Shirts
  • Casual Clothing
  • Bags

Advantages

  • Good Dimensional
  • Stability
  • Non-Static
  • Durable
  • Hydrophillic

Disadvantages

  • Poor elasticity
  • Not resistant to mildew

Banana Silk

This fiber is created by combing banana stalks together to create yarn. A satin-like appearance, despite being coarse, makes it a finer alternative to bamboo.

Key Uses:

Banana silk finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Tablecloths
  • Curtains
  • Upholstery
  • Bags
  • Floor Matts
  • Authentic Kimonos

Advantages

  • Durable
  • Smooth
  • Satin-Like Appearance
  • Biodegradable

Disadvantages

  • Course
  • Rare

Barathea

Typically made from wool, silk, or cotton, Barathea is a twill fabric that is woven in a hopsack pattern. Evening coats, jackets, and military uniforms are often made from it, which provides a slight pebbled finish.

Key Uses:

Barathea finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Military Uniform
  • Neckties
  • Evening Coats
  • Jackets

Advantages

  • Price
  • Machine Washable

Disadvantages

  • High Maintenance
  • Limited Versatility

Batik

Batik is a traditional fabric characterized by its unique dyeing process, which uses wax-resist techniques to create intricate patterns and designs. Originating in Indonesia, batik is an art form that involves applying wax to the fabric in specific areas, dyeing the fabric, and then removing the wax to reveal the pattern. This process can be repeated multiple times with different colors to create layered and complex designs. Batik fabrics are used in a variety of cultural and contemporary clothing, as well as in home decor, showcasing vibrant colors and distinctive motifs.

Key Uses:

Batik fabrics finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Dresses, Skirts & Shirts
  • Scarves
  • Home decor

Advantages

  • Durable
  • Versatile

Disadvantages

  • Stiff
  • High Maintenance

Explore Our Batik Fabrics

Batiste

The Cambric fabric, known for its plain weave, is crafted from cotton. It is denser and opaque compared to voile, making it a popular choice for lining designer garments.

Key Uses:

Batiste finds its application in various areas, with notable uses including:

  • Shirting
  • Tops
  • Dresses
  • Skirts
  • Lingerie

Advantages

  • Lightweight
  • Soft
  • Drapable
  • Breathable

Disadvantages

  • No Heat Retention
  • Easily Wrinkled

Calico (Muslin)

Originating in India, calico is a simple, unbleached cotton fabric used historically for everyday textiles and clothing.

Key Uses:

Calico finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Pattern making
  • Toiles
  • Aprons
  • Quilts

Advantages

  • Breathable
  • affordable

Disadvantages

  • Prone to shrinkage
  • Less durable

Cambric (Batiste)

From France, cambric is a lightweight cotton or linen fabric valued for its smooth, lustrous finish and fine weave.

Key Uses:

Cambric finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Handkerchiefs
  • Fine linens
  • Shirting

Advantages

  • Breathable
  • Soft

Disadvantages

  • Can wrinkle easily
  • Delicate

Canvas

Historically used for sails, canvas is a durable plain-weave fabric now popular in various robust applications.

Key Uses:

Canvas finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Bags
  • Shoes
  • Workwear
  • Upholstery

Advantages

  • Strong
  • Versatile

Disadvantages

  • Can be stiff
  • Heavy

Explore Our Canvas Fabrics

Cashmere

Cashmere, with its roots in the Kashmir region, is renowned for its ultra-soft texture and insulating properties.

Key Uses:

Cashmere finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Sweaters
  • Scarves
  • Hats
  • Gloves

Advantages

  • Soft
  • Warm

Disadvantages

  • Requires delicate care
  • Expensive

Explore Our Cashmere Fabrics

Chambray

Chambray, a denim-look alike, is a breathable cotton fabric that originated in Cambrai, France.

Key Uses:

Chambray finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Shirts
  • Dresses

Advantages

  • Durable
  • Soft
  • Lightweight

Disadvantages

  • Can wrinkle
  • Limited stretch

Damask

Damask boasts elaborate patterns and is revered for its aesthetic appeal on jacquard looms, often featuring reversible looks.

Key Uses:

Damask finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Upholstery
  • Drapery
  • Table Linens
  • Clothing

Advantages

  • Durable
  • Intricate designs
  • Reversible patterns

Disadvantages

  • Can be expensive
  • Requires careful cleaning

Deadstock

Deadstock refers to unused fabric left over from mills or garment production, offering an eco-friendly material choice.

Key Uses:

Deadstock finds its application in various industries, including:

  • Clothing
  • Accessories
  • Home decor